Digestive System Disorders

Expert reports about Digestive System Disorders


INFORMATION FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE STOMACH OR DUODENAL ULCERS, AND/OR EROSIVE ESOPHAGITIS DURING PREGNANCY OR BREASTFEEDING

 

What are stomach or duodenal ulcers and erosive esophagitis?

A peptic ulcer is a sore in the inner lining of the stomach or intestine. Also known as a gastric ulcer, a stomach ulcer is a painful open sore in the lining of the stomach, whereas a duodenal ulcer is found in the lining of the duodenum, the first section of the small intestine that connects with the stomach. Erosive esophagitis is a severe complication of acidic stomach contents flowing the wrong way up into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD]) and eroding (wearing out) the parts of the esophageal wall. Also called ulcerative esophagitis, erosive esophagitis is most likely from severe GERD, but also can occur together with peptic ulcer disease. Most commonly, gastric and duodenal ulcers are caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori, a corkscrew-shaped bacterial species that can infect the upper portions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. H. pylori infection, leading to peptic ulcer disease, can develop during pregnancy, just as it can develop outside of pregnancy. Erosive esophagitis can occur during pregnancy, because the growing womb puts pressure on abdominal contents, making you more susceptible to GERD.


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